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It may sometimes happen that what may appear to be poor result at your table is salvaged by the efforts of your team-mates:

The first session of the Open final was a classic game of two halves. Monaco led 41-12 after 8 deals, but the Netherlands hit back strongly to take the second eight 32-2 to lead by a single IMP. This was one of many dramatic deals:

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North led the ace of hearts and declarer ruffed, cashed the ace of clubs throwing a diamond, ruffed a club, ruffed a heart (South pitching the queen of clubs) and ruffed a club with the seven of spades. South followed the sound defensive principle of refusing to overruff, instead discarding the two of diamonds. Declarer played a spade from dummy, but when he put up the king North won with the ace and could now have ensured the demise of the contract by switching to a diamond. However, he continued with the king of hearts and declarer ruffed and played a club, pitching a heart from dummy. South ruffed and returned the king of diamonds and all declarer could do was win with the ace and pitch a heart on a club. South could ruff and play a diamond and declarer had to lose a heart trick at the end, -50.
Instead of discarding a heart on the fourth club declarer should pitch a diamond! South ruffs and plays a diamond, but declarer ruffs and exits with the jack of spades to force South to resurrect declarer’s hand.

Suppose declarer follows a different line, ruffing the heart lead, ruffing a club and playing a spade to the nine? North wins and plays a heart, but declarer ruffs, ruffs a club, plays a spade to the king followed by winning clubs, emerging with eleven tricks.

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West led the ace of clubs and when East discarded a spade West switched to the spade five. Declarer won perforce with dummy’s ace and cashed the ace of hearts. When West pitched the seven of clubs declarer played a diamond to the nine, king and ace and West cashed the king of spades and continued with the ten. With all the communications he needed declarer had the rest, +430 and 9 IMPs to Monaco.
To defeat 3NT West must lead a spade at trick one. If declarer plays a diamond after winning in dummy, East plays the nine and West wins with the ace. He must then exit with a low club after which declarer has no way to untangle his tricks.

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